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SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans Available to Arizona Small Businesses

SBA LogoSACRAMENTO, Calif. – Small, non-farm businesses in five Arizona counties and three neighboring counties in California are now eligible to apply for low-interest federal disaster loans from the U. S. Small Business Administration (SBA).  “These loans offset economic losses because of reduced revenues caused by the drought that began February 18, 2014, in La Paz County,” announced Tanya N. Garfield, Director of SBA’s Disaster Field Operations Center-West.

Primary Arizona county: La Paz;

Neighboring Arizona counties: Maricopa, Mohave, Yavapai and Yuma;

Neighboring California counties: Imperial, Riverside and San Bernardino.

“SBA eligibility covers both the economic impacts on businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers that have suffered agricultural production losses caused by the disaster and businesses directly impacted by the disaster,” Garfield said.

Small, nonfarm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private, nonprofit organizations of any size may qualify for Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) of up to $2 million to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have been met had the disaster not occurred.

“Eligibility for these loans is based on the financial impact of the disaster only and not on any actual property damage.  These loans have an interest rate of 4% for businesses and 2.625% for private, nonprofit organizations, a maximum term of 30 years, and are available to small businesses and most private, nonprofits without the financial ability to offset the adverse impact without hardship,” Garfield said.

By law, SBA makes EIDLs available when the U. S. Secretary of Agriculture designates an agricultural disaster.  Secretary Tom Vilsack declared this disaster on April 16, 2014.

Businesses primarily engaged in farming or ranching are not eligible for SBA disaster assistance.  Agricultural enterprises should contact the Farm Services Agency (FSA) about the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) assistance made available by the Secretary’s declaration.  However, in drought disasters nurseries are eligible for SBA disaster assistance.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure Web site at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Disaster loan information and application forms are also available from SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling (800) 659-2955 or e-mailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.  Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339.  For more information about SBA’s disaster assistance programs, visit http://www.sba.gov/disaster

The deadline to apply for these loans is December 16, 2014.

Cal OES Swears in New Chief Deputy Director, Nancy Ward and Chief Counsel, Jill Tally

Today, Cal OES Director Mark Ghilarducci officially swears in new Deputy Director Nancy Ward and Jill Tally, Chief Legal Counsel.

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Nancy Ward has been appointed as the new Cal OES Chief Deputy Director and has served in multiple positions for FEMA Region IX of the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency since 2000, including Regional Administrator and Director of the Response and Recovery Division. Additionally, Ward was Chief of the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services Disaster Assistance Division from 1993 to 2000 and a Staff Services Manager at the California Department of Social Services from 1989 to 1993.

JTS_9895Jill Tally has been appointed as the new Cal OES Chief Counsel.  Talley has served as a Supervising Deputy Attorney General at the California Attorney General’s Office since 2012 and has been a Professor of Law at Lincoln Law School of Sacramento since 2011. She served as a Deputy Attorney General at the California Attorney General’s Office from 2002 to 2012 and was an associate at Loeb and Loeb LLP from 1999 to 2002. Talley was a partner at Feldman and Talley LLP from 1998 to 1999 and an associate at Feldman and Shaffery from 1996 to 1998 and at Hornberger and Criswell from 1994 to 1996. Additionally, she earned a Juris Doctor degree from the Pepperdine University School of Law and is a member of the Anthony M. Kennedy Inn of Court and the Sacramento County Bar Association.

 

 

Earthquake Preparedness Month: Are you awake or have you fallen asleep?

Just a few days before the month of April began, two earthquakes rocked Southern California. First, a 5.1 magnitude quake in La Habra on March 28, followed by a 4.1 aftershock 20 miles southeast of Los Angeles the next day. These jolts shook buildings and rattled nerves, but did not cause significant damage. It seems as if Mother Nature was kicking off Earthquake Preparedness Month with a wake up call for all to be ready and prepared for an earthquake, wherever you might be!

Southern California gets more earthquakes than any part of the U.S., only Alaska and the Big Island of Hawaii see more than California. On average, Southern California has about 10,000 earthquakes each year, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). That’s more than 27 a day!

We live in Earthquake Country; scientists believe there is a probability of more than 99% that in the next 30 years California will experience one or more magnitude 6.7 or greater quakes.

In 2012, USGS released a 13-year study on the Cascadia Subduction Zone that amplifies why everyone needs to be prepared. This study reveals that Northern California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia are home to this dangerous fault line and while it’s not as famous as the San Andreas fault, this zone may have a much more dangerous potential. In the study, scientists say that America’s Pacific Northwest has a 37% chance of being hit by a magnitude 8 or larger earthquake in the next 50 years. If a 9.0 earthquake were to strike along the state’s northern coast it could kill tens of thousands of people and cause $70 billion in damage.

It’s now mid-April. Have you hit the snooze button and fallen asleep on personal preparedness? Why not use this early wake up call and do everything we can to be better prepared to survive and recover, wherever we live, work, or travel.

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M. Reginald Salvador Appointed as Chief of Legislative and External Affairs at Cal OES

caloeslogo-horizontalSACRAMENTO – Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today announced the following appointment.

M. Reginald Salvador, 40, of Folsom, has been appointed chief of legislative and external affairs at the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services. Salvador has been a co-founder and the managing director of Diamante Partners LLC since 2007. He was program director at James Lee Witt Associates from 2004 to 2011 and a board advisor at the California Integrated Waste Management Board from 2003 to 2004. Salvador served in multiple positions in the Office of Governor Gray Davis from 1999 to 2003, including deputy cabinet secretary and special assistant to the cabinet secretary. He was a policy analyst in the Office of Lieutenant Governor Gray Davis from 1998 to 1999. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100,608. Salvador is a Democrat.

To read more on other appointments announced today, click here.

SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans Available to California Small Businesses

SBA LogoSACRAMENTO, Calif. – Small, nonfarm businesses in three California counties and neighboring counties in Arizona are now eligible to apply for low-interest federal disaster loans from the U. S. Small Business Administration (SBA).  “These loans offset economic losses because of reduced revenues caused by the drought that began on February 11, 2014, in the following primary county,” announced Tanya N. Garfield, Director of SBA’s Disaster Field Operations Center-West.

Primary California county:  Imperial;

Neighboring California counties:  Riverside and San Diego;

Neighboring Arizona counties:  La Paz and Yuma.

“SBA eligibility covers both the economic impacts on businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers that have suffered agricultural production losses caused by the disaster and businesses directly impacted by the disaster,” Garfield said.

 Small, nonfarm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private, nonprofit organizations of any size may qualify for Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) of up to $2 million to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have been met had the disaster not occurred.

 “Eligibility for these loans is based on the financial impact of the disaster only and not on any actual property damage.  These loans have an interest rate of 4% for businesses and 2.625% for private, nonprofit organizations, a maximum term of 30 years, and are available to small businesses and most private, nonprofits without the financial ability to offset the adverse impact without hardship,” Garfield said.

By law, SBA makes EIDLs available when the U. S. Secretary of Agriculture designates an agricultural disaster.  Secretary Tom Vilsack declared this disaster on April 9, 2014.

Businesses primarily engaged in farming or ranching are not eligible for SBA disaster assistance.  Agricultural enterprises should contact the Farm Services Agency (FSA) about the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) assistance made available by the Secretary’s declaration.  However, in drought disasters nurseries are eligible for SBA disaster assistance.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure Web site at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Disaster loan information and application forms are also available from SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling (800) 659-2955 or e-mailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.  Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339.  For more information about SBA’s disaster assistance programs, visit http://www.sba.gov/disaster.

The deadline to apply for these loans is December 9, 2014.

Drought Task Force Meets with Central Coast on Drought Impacts, Response Efforts

 Governor’s Drought Task Force Discusses Drought Impacts in Santa Cruz.

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Today, leaders of the Governor’s Drought Task Force met with local officials in Santa Cruz County to hear first-hand accounts and direct impacts of the current drought. City and county leaders, water managers and elected officials gathered at the Santa Cruz Police Department to hear directly from each of the Task Force Members – Cal OES Director Mark Ghilarducci; California Natural Resources Agency Secretary John Laird; California Department of Public Health Deputy Director Mark Starr and California Department of Food & Agriculture Undersecretary Sandra Schubert on the actions the State Government can take to mitigate the impacts of the current drought.

“Our goal continues to be in front of this crisis,” said Mark Ghilarducci, Chair of the Governor’s Drought Task Force.

California is a very diverse state, and therefore every area has been affected differently. These meetings give the Governor’s Drought Task Force leaders an opportunity to speak with local officials on their unique issues about the drought while the State monitors the overall picture and the current impacts to agriculture, businesses, jobs, and the cost of commodities, like food and other supplies.

“We are going around the state to hear what’s going on in your communities and break down traditional ways to go about solutions,” said John Laird, Secretary – California Natural Resources Agency. “This drought is showing us that people are working together, and we’re never far from the people we work with.”

The 10-mile wide strip of Santa Cruz County that stretches between the coast and the crest of the Santa Cruz Mountains at the northern end of the Monterey Bay is a good example to the rest of the state that water does not share boundaries. In the scarcity of water, the people of Santa Cruz have been actively involved in water conservation efforts and sharing good practices.

“It was impressive to hear from the community about the steps they are taking to address water supply issues related to the drought.  CDPH is happy to be part of the solution and to continue to help tackle ongoing drought related drinking water concerns,” said Mark Starr, CDPH deputy director.

The task force reminded attendees to continue to communicate their specific problems as the year progresses, so state leaders can engage with emergency networks, leverage both levels of government and collaborate for solutions.

“This meeting was very successful, we heard specific issues, so we know what kind of actions we need to take,” said Sandra Schubert, Undersecretary of the Department of Food and Agriculture.

Even with the recent storms, we continue to have one of the driest years in the history of California. Water conservation is the most cost-effective and environmentally sound way to reduce demand for water.

For the latest actions by the state and the Drought Task Force, follow us on Twitter!

Urban Search & Rescue Task Force 7 Deploys for Washington State for Mudslide Response

Sacramento City TF7 Deploys for Wa State

Images captured on April 2, 2014 as US&R TF7 prepared their gear for deployment in Sacramento, Calif.

In response to a request from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services coordinated the activation and deployment of Urban Search & Rescue Task Force 7, based at the Sacramento City Fire Department, to the mudslide affected area near Arlington, Washington.

On March 22, 2014, a large mudslide occurred 17 miles east of Arlington, WA near Oso (pop. 180), in Snohomish County.  Mud, debris, and scarring span 1.3 square miles, block State Route 530, damaged structures and covered a large area to an estimated depth of 15 to 20 feet deep in places. Several fatalities have been confirmed and there are still people unaccounted for.

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